Let's have a quickie . . . with audio | MINUTE REVIEWS {3}





Touchdown | London Bound




Alexa:
I hate him, but I want him…
 
I hate the emotional blackmail that my mom gives me for not being with Sebastian, the guy my mom wanted me to marry. I never wanted him. But if I don’t, my mom will end her relationship with me. 

I am only interested in the quarterback who I cheered for on the sidelines, even though I hate his guts. Regardless, I can’t deny what my body and heart desired. But we are about to graduate and go our separate ways. What am I going to do? 


Martin:
I’ve always loved her, but I’m poorer than she knows...
 
Playing my last year in college as the star quarterback people thought I was, it was bittersweet. I hope I get drafted into the NFL to be able to help pay my family back for all they’ve done, and get them out of that trailer. But that would mean being far from Alexa. 

She was the cheerleader I always wanted by my side. But man, she could be so stuck up sometimes! That was until our friends locked us up in the dorm and wouldn’t let us leave til we sorted things out. I have no idea what will happen next… 



The voice of the characters sounded young, naive, and a bit immature. These characters are in the process of finishing up their final months of college and getting ready to go into the real world. At that stage in life, I expect a higher level of maturity than what was displayed here. 

The plot was very bland with nothing attention-grabbing or making it worth while to invest in the story or characters. There was a disconnect from the characters and all the sudden “requirements” of a romance novel. It all seemed too forced.

The epilogue was jam-packed with HEA’s and it was a bombardment of eye roll inducing information.
Overall, this book was a quick read for a lazy afternoon, but nothing to write home about.

As far as the audio goes, it was absolutely awful. There was constant skipping which led to words getting cut out, random pauses, and delays in the audio. There were also moments of low volume and then sudden high volume that was irritating. The narrator herself lacked emotion and cadence to her narrative. All of that really ruined the flow of the story and the listening experience as a whole.

If you want to check this book out, I highly suggest reading this book instead of listening to the audio version.

Random thought: Why is the subtitle, A “Bad Boy” Sports Romance? Martin wasn’t a bad boy. Like, at all. He was sweet and gentlemanly, and smart. No kind of bad was involved whatsoever. 



Roxy Sinclaire writes steamy, suspenseful romantic stories as the main genre, and this includes a variety of different topics. Some of these include dark romances, action packed romances, mafia romances, and many more. She currently works in customer relations in New York City, but is trying to fulfill her passion in writing and eventually have her dream job become a reality.






When Leslie Lincoln, a spunky, red-headed American, suffers an awkward moment with an arousingly-sexy British man—she thinks her life can't get any more pathetic. 

She's done with men. 
She doesn't need them. 
She especially doesn't need their muscular thighs. 
No siree, she's going to forget all about the brooding, complicated, and seductive "Theo" who captivated her on the dance floor of a London nightclub. 

Keep telling yourself that, Lez..... 

Immersing herself into a new type of romantic cleanse, Leslie thinks she'll never lay eyes on Theo again. But somehow, he's managed to bulldoze his way back in—her cheetah-print onesie pajamas be damned. 

He wants more. 
She wants to run. 
But he can’t seem to let her go. 
Both of them have a past—and neither want to share. 
How can love possibly survive in darkness? 



London Bound was filled with humor, romance, pain and heart. I unfortunately couldn’t get into the heart of the story. This can be read as a standalone, which is how I read it. Based on my experience however, I’d recommend reading the first two books prior so that you get all the in-depth history of these characters. I think it would have given me a better connection to all the characters in general. Perhaps that’s why I didn’t much care for any of them.

Theo was charming and kind, but he held a pain within that kept him prisoner to those emotions. He was quite endearing, and the patience he had with Leslie certainly upped his likability. 

Leslie was extremely exasperating. She had a troubled past which held her back and caused her to be so guarded, but it still made her so unlikable for me. While Theo was being a sweetheart, she kept turning him down harshly. At one point, she no longer deserved his attention in my opinion. She was rude and annoyingly immature. No matter what she had been through, it didn’t excuse her behavior. Rejection after rejection wore me down.

I really enjoyed the British dialect and it was an obvious necessity with the story being set in London, but it wasn’t always on point. There were quite a few incorrect uses of slang words and terms. Because of this, certain scenes didn’t have the correct atmosphere and didn’t get the same result as it was likely intended to have.

Nevertheless, this was a sweet and heartwarming story with strong friendships and a positive message about taking chances in life.



Amy Daws lives in South Dakota with her husband, and miracle daughter, Lorelei. The long-awaited birth of Lorelei is what inspired Amy’s first book, Chasing Hope, and her passion for writing. Amy is a lover of all things British and her award-nominated romantic comedy series, The London Lovers Series, is centered around Americans in London. It's emotional and self-deprecating with lots of humor sprinkled in. 
On most nights, you can find Amy and her family dancing to Strawberry Shortcake’s theme song or stuffing themselves inside children’s-sized playhouses because there is nothing they wouldn’t do for their little miracle. 





*These audiobooks were provided to me via Audiobook Boom at no charge by the author/narrator in exchange for an honest review.



-Posted & Reviewed By-
-Zandalee-

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